Radiation Dose Chart

The sievert (Sv) is the international unit for measuring radiation exposure.
Rem and millirem are the units used to measure radiation.
1 Sv = 100 rems

Use the radiation dose chart below as a quick reference for approximate doses.

Millisieverts (mSv)
0.04 mSv Approximate dose of radiation from one chest x-ray
0.24 mSv/year Approximate amount of cosmic radiation acquired by individuals living at sea level
0.3 mSv Approximate dose acquired by a single mammogram
0.4 mSv/year Approximate amount of natural radioactivity in the body
0.5 mSv/year Average amount of radiation acquired by individuals living in Denver, Colorado, US
1.5 to 2.5 mSv/year Average dose US nuclear industry employess and uranium miners collect in a year (aside from medical and background doses)
2 mSv/year Amount of radon acquired from living in an average home
2.4 mSv/year Average background radiation acquired by people (varies depending on individual’s location)
9 mSv/year Typical radiation exposure acquired by airline crew flying from New York to Tokyo via polar route
10 mSv Dose of radiation from an abdomen and pelvis CT scan
14 mSv Dose of radiation from a single gastrointestinal series procedure
20 mSv/year Average yearly radiation dose limit for nuclear industry employees and uranium miners during usual operations
36 mSv/year Dose of radiation per year of smoking 1-1/2 packs of cigarettes daily
50 mSv Permissible short-term dose for emergency workers
50 mSv/year Dose that workers should not exceed in a year while carrying out normal duties
50 mSv/year Dose rate in natural background levels at several sites in Europe, India and Iran
100 mSv Permissible short-term dose for radiation workers taking vital corrective actions
100 mSv Lowest annual dose at which an increase in cancer is evident
100 mSv Recommended limit for radiation workers over a five-year timeframe
500 mSv Permissible short-term dose for emergency workers performing life-saving actions
800 mSv/year Highest level of natural background radiation ever recorded (on a Brazilian black beach)
1,000 mSv Short-term dose that causes temporary radiation sickness inccluding nausea and low white blood cell count; non-fatal
1,000 mSv Short-term dose that is presumed likely to cause fatal cancer many years later in approximately 5 out of 100 people exposed to the radiation
4,000 mSv Short-term dose that causes hair loss and bleeding; could be fatal within 4-6 weeks, especially if left untreated
5,000 mSv Short-term dose that is fatal within a month to about 50% of the people receiving it as a whole body dose.
10,000 mSv Short-term dose that is fatal within 2-4 weeks
30,000 mSv Short-term dose that causes tremors and seizures; fatal within 48 hours

 

Primary Sources: World Nuclear Association, Environmental Protection Agency, Radiologyinfo.org.